Category Archives: Research and trends

Dean Associates takes a look at new research and trends in education and schooling.

Teacher retention in London

We are often asked by parents new to the capital whether it is normal for there to be such a high turnover in teachers within state schools.

It has been noted that London schools do struggle with holding on to their teachers, with figures revealing that more than four out of 10 teachers are not working in London five years after qualifying.

Schools across England do struggle to recruit and retain staff, but the problem is most acute in inner London where just 57% of teachers who qualified in 2012 were still working in the classroom by 2017.

 

Some of this is down to natural movement in the teaching population – especially in London where many teachers view their roles as transitionary or a starting point for further career development away from the city.

However, it is certainly true that both pay and working conditions drive some teachers away from the profession.

The current political party manifestos ahead of the election all call for greater investment in education (it would be a surprise if they said otherwise) but perhaps more resource should be focused on retaining teachers rather than just aiming to recruit new ones.

How outstanding is Outstanding?

The integrity of the gold standard of English state education – the OFSTED “Outstanding” rating – has been brought into question.

The head of OFSTED has commented that these top-rated schools are a “blind-spot” in the education system as they are inspected so infrequently.   The decision by the government in 2011 to exempt outstanding schools from routine inspections – brought about by a need to focus limited resources on poorly performing schools – has meant that some schools had not been inspected in over a decade.

Even schools rated “Good”, the second category, only receive a one-day inspection every four years.

The government provides a counter argument that annual performance data provides parents with transparency on how a school is working and that OFSTED would inspect a school in response to parental concerns.

Performance data is helpful – though not always easy to understand since the introduction of a parallel measurement of  pure performance in testing and student progress measurement.  There is also useful information to be mined – though harder to interpret –  with such key indicators as pupil spend, attendance and socio-economic background.

However the importance of on-the-ground support is vital here – revealing soft data such as changes in leadership, teacher turn-over, school morale and pressure on space – that is often impossible find through the Google search.

 

 

How state schools impact the housing market

A new study  has shown that parents in England are prepared to pay a considerable premium if they want to live near a top state secondary school.

The report showed that homes near the best secondary schools command an average house price of £415,844, adding 45pc to the English average.

The data from Lloyds Bank reveals that over the past five years, the average property price in areas with a top-performing state school has grown by £116,696 (39pc), compared to a rise of £51,264 (22pc) across England.

Rental prices are similarly affected by the location of secondary schools.

The study noted how this can impact on the social mix of those state schools, stating  “The popularity of areas close to high performing schools may mean that homes remain unaffordable for buyers on average earnings.”

Many families do make house buying decisions without fully understanding their preferred school’s admissions criteria.  For example, a selective grammar school or faith school will view the location of the house as a less important consideration than academic ability or church attendance when admitting pupils.  Even factors such as sibling priority can alter the “catchment” area of a school year on year, especially in urban areas.

 

Independent school fees rise

Dean Associates’ annual review of independent school fees across the UK has shown an average rise of around 3.5% from academic year 2016/17.

This is similar to the rise over the previous year, but a little higher than the three year period 2012-2015 that saw increases capped at just around 3% per year.  The chart below shows how this figure has evolved since 2009.

 

 

The independent schools market still appears to be strong, with high demand in most urban areas, although more flexibility on space in rural day schools, especially at primary level.

There is still much debate about the validity of the independent school sector’s charitable status with some critics arguing that the fees should be eligible for VAT – however, this is unlikely to come into play unless a new General Election bring the Labour Party into power.

Many independent schools are also trying to counter this argument – offering greater public access to their facilities and a wider range of means-tested bursary places.